2018-2019 Catalog

Academic Standards for Undergraduate Students

Academic Honesty

The University considers honesty vital to its academic life. Therefore, it requires that students learn and abide by the standards of honesty expected in an academic community.

In general, academic honesty requires that students: (1) submit work that is clearly and unmistakably their own; (2) properly represent information and give adequate acknowledgment to all sources that were used in the preparation of an assignment; (3) neither seek, accept, nor provide any assistance on tests, quizzes, and/or assignments unless explicitly permitted to do so by the instructor.

Penalties and Reporting Procedures

Because they undermine the whole nature of academic life, all forms of cheating, plagiarism, and misrepresenting academic records are considered serious offenses in the academic community. In the event of violations, penalties will be imposed based on the degree of the offense. The individual instructor has the right and responsibility to make the course grade reflect a student’s academic dishonesty. At the instructor’s discretion, the student may receive a reduced or failing grade for a single piece of work or for the entire course in which there was academic dishonesty.

In cases of suspected academic dishonesty, the instructor initiates a ‘Confidential Suspected Violation of Academic Honesty Report’, making every effort to reach student by phone, email, and other modes of communication in order to discuss the circumstances. After 15 working days, the instructor completes the report—with or without an accompanying discussion with the student—sending a copy to the student and the original to the Academic Affairs Office, together with supporting documentation. These documents remain confidentially in the Academic Affairs Office, unless a copy to the student’s permanent academic file is indicated by the instructor.

The Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs shall endeavor to determine the extent of possible academic misconduct. If evidence of prior academic dishonesty is on record with the Academic Affairs Office, the student may be subject to suspension or dismissal from the University. All penalties may be appealed by the student according to the procedures outlined below. In all cases the confidentiality of the students and or the faculty members shall be upheld.

Student Appeal Process

See "Academic Appeals Concerning a Grade or Requirement in a Particular Course."

Specific Violation of Academic Honesty

Specific violations of academic honesty include plagiarism, computer-assisted plagiarism, misrepresentation of sources, distortion of information, use of written work prepared by others, and multiple submission of papers without the permission of instructors.

To give students practical guidance in adhering to these requirements, below are noted the following specific violations of academic honesty and the ways in which they can be avoided:

Plagiarism

Plagiarism (which comes from the Latin word, plagiare, to kidnap) is using the distinctive words or ideas of another as if they were your own. This includes all categories of expression: literary, artistic, scientific, mechanical, etc. All forms of plagiarism are violations of academic honesty.

In scholarship, another person’s distinctive words and/or ideas are regarded as his/her intellectual “property”. Respect for this “property” is as essential as respect for any property, and this respect is ensured when a student properly acknowledges the contributions of others to his/her work.

Awareness of debt to another person’s work is essential in avoiding plagiarism, but it is not enough. Students must also be careful scholars. Therefore, to avoid plagiarism, students should:

  1. Take accurate notes when reading. Quote accurately and paraphrase correctly. Carefully write down the author, book or periodical title, and page numbers of quotes and paraphrases.
  2. When using quotes or paraphrases in a paper, acknowledge specific sources by internal references or footnotes.
  3. Carefully cite author, title, publication data, and page numbers (where appropriate) of all sources consulted.

In all subjects, some facts and ideas are considered general knowledge and need not be cited. Instructors can answer questions about whether or not information falls into this category. Remember: when doubt exists, cite the source. Note: Careful scholarship applies to oral as well as written reports. In giving an oral report, students should also be aware of debts to sources. They should write down references in notes, acknowledge these references where appropriate throughout the report, and cite all sources upon request at the end of the presentation.

Computer Assisted Plagiarism

Students are reminded that computer-assisted plagiarism—i.e., representing another person’s work as their own—is still plagiarism. Student abuse of computer-assisted plagiarism is subject to the penalties stated in the Academic Honesty policy. The following are examples of computer assisted plagiarism:

  • If a student copies a computer file that contains another student’s assignment and submits it as his/her own work.
  • If a student copies a computer file that contains another student’s assignment and uses it as a model for his/her own assignment.
  • If students work together on an assignment, sharing the computer files or programs involved, and then submit individual copies of the assignment as their own individual work.
  • If a student knowingly allows another student to copy or use one of his/her computer files and then to submit that file, or a modification thereof, as his/her individual work.

(Adapted from Policy for Responsible Computing, CSU, Monterey Bay University)

Misrepresentation of Sources and Distortion of Information

All misrepresentations of sources and distortion of facts and/or ideas constitute a violation of academic honesty. This includes:

  • All misleading or inaccurate references to authors, titles, publishing data, or page numbers in footnotes, internal references, and bibliographies; and
  • Any alteration of facts or ideas which misrepresents the meaning or intent of the original source (i.e., taking words out of context or misrepresentations of data in graphs, statistics, lab reports, etc.).

In order to avoid unintentional misrepresentations of information, students should take careful notes and transfer them accurately to their papers or reports. Before submitting work, students must proofread to verify the accuracy of statements and citations.

Use of Written Work Prepared by “Ghost Writers” or Others

Submission of written essays, research papers, science reports, laboratory results, computer programs, or homework assignments, etc. prepared by a person other than the student submitting the assignment as his/her own work constitutes a misrepresentation of academic work and is a violation of academic honesty.

Discussion of essay topics, problems, or lab projects with teachers or friends helps to generate and clarify ideas and is not only permitted but also encouraged (unless the faculty member states that the work is to be done independently). However, the written assignment or report that is the product of these discussions must be the work of the student, a written expression of his/her final reflections on the subject.

Multiple Submission

The same paper or report may not be submitted to two different classes in the same term, nor be resubmitted to another class in another term without the explicit permission of the instructors involved. To do so is a violation of academic honesty.

If, rather than write two separate papers, a student wishes to write a longer, more comprehensive paper or report that would incorporate the work being done in two related courses, the student must explain his/her academic goals for the project and secure the permission of the instructor in each class before starting work on the paper.

Specific Comments on Test-taking

Any assistance on in-class tests and quizzes is considered a violation of academic honesty. This includes verbal assistance from another student, sharing notes, sharing pre-coded computers or devices, and the use of any books or notes not explicitly permitted by the instructor. (These rules also apply to take-home tests, unless the instructor gives explicit directions to the contrary.)

In order to avoid any possible misunderstanding:

  • Students should not bring books and notes, electronic or written, into the classroom on a testing day unless otherwise advised by the instructor.
  • Students should avoid any interaction with other students during a test unless they have the explicit permission of the instructor.

Classroom Expectations

Guidelines for Responding to Disruptive Student Behavior

Holy Names University strives to provide a safe and secure environment for all students, employees and visitors. Acts of violence, threats and threatening behavior are not acceptable behaviors at Holy Names University and will not be tolerated. Students and instructors are expected to maintain professional relationships characterized by courtesy and mutual respect.

Disruptive behavior involves conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person. This behavior infringes upon the rights of members of the HNU community. Disruptive behavior is defined as any behavior in a classroom or other learning environment that interferes with the learning process. This includes, but is not limited to, environments of teaching, research administration, disciplinary proceedings, university activities, university life, community service activities or university authorized activities.

Examples of disruptive behaviors include, but are not limited to, verbal or physical abuse, verbal or physical threats, intimidation, harassment, coercion, repeated obscenities, argumentative and/or combative behavior or other obstructions, whether experienced verbally, physically, electronically or otherwise.

Scope

The scope of the policy includes persons:

  • On university property
  • At university sponsored events
  • Fulfilling the duties of a university student off-campus (i.e. nursing clinicals, internships, conferences)
  • Conducting university business or representing the university
  • Engaging in any disruptive activity that results in a negative impact on the university or university community.

Response to Disruptive Behavior

  • In a situation of classroom or activity disruption, the instructor should first indicate to the student(s) that the behavior is disruptive and provide an opportunity for the individual(s) to conform to the expected standards of the class. It is hoped that in the majority of instances the matter can be resolved in this initial, informal manner.
  • If the behavior continues, the student(s) should be given an immediate, direct, warning to discontinue the behavior.
  • If the disruption continues or reoccurs at a later class the instructor may repeat the initial request to discontinue, or ask the student(s) to leave the classroom or university-sponsored event.
  • If a student(s) refuses to leave upon request the instructor shall call Campus Safety to assist in removing the student.
  • If at any time the instructor considers that he/she is in immediate danger or is concerned about personal safety, Campus Safety at ext. 1234 should be contacted. They will respond to the site and provide appropriate response to the immediate concern.
  • In the situation where the student(s) has been asked to leave the class, the instructor shall notify, in writing, the Chairperson, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the Vice President for Student Affairs. This report shall include information relating to the incident and subsequent steps taken for resolution.
  • The Vice President for Student Affairs, or designate, will conduct a review of the incident. This review may consist of interview with the involved student(s), involved instructor, Chairperson, Vice President for Academic Affairs, security and any other involved parties.
  • The Vice President for Student Affairs, or designate, will then resolve the problem in the manner, which seems most appropriate. Examples of resolutions may include return to the class/activity with the expectation that behaviors will conform to expected standards, removal from the class/activity, change to another setting, suspension from the class for the semester, suspension from the University or any other resolution dependent on the circumstances.
  • The Vice President for Student Affairs, or designate, will communicate the resolution of the situation to involved parties in writing, as is allowable by FERPA.

Attendance

Regular attendance at classes is not only expected but is considered essential for successful academic work. A student with excessive absences may receive a grade of F. Excessive absences are those which exceed the number designated in a class syllabus or total more than one-fifth of the scheduled class hours. The student must assume full responsibility for work missed because of absence, including any additional work assigned to compensate for the absence. Students will not be permitted to register for classes that overlap in meeting times and result in accumulated partial absences.

Final Examinations

Final examinations are given only at the day and hour specified in the published Final Exam Schedule. Any student who has an overly concentrated examination schedule should inform his/her instructors at the beginning of the term. With the approval of the Chairperson, the instructor may negotiate a time change for the student in rare occasions.

Academic Progress and Status

To be in good standing, an undergraduate student must maintain a minimum cumulative and semester grade point averages of 2.0. Failure to do so may result in Academic Warning, Probation, or Disqualification from Holy Names University. The Academic Affairs Office notifies each student who is on academic warning or probation or is academically disqualified. All students are encouraged to seek assistance when their grades are not satisfactory. Academic advisors, faculty, peer advisors, and student affairs staff are available to assist students.

Semester Progress Notification

Academic staff collaborate with faculty to monitor the academic progress of HNU students. Students may receive a Semester Progress Report from their professor indicating satisfactory of unsatisfactory progress. Follow up communication informs the student as to how the university can provide support in their academic pursuits.

Undergraduate Academic Warning

Undergraduate students who earn less than a 2.0 grade point average in any semester but maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher will receive a notice of Academic Warning from the Academic Affairs Office. The purpose of such a notice is to alert the student of the need to take immediate measures to improve academic performance. Failure to clear Academic Warning will result in being placed on Academic Probation.

Undergraduate Academic Probation

Undergraduate students will be placed on Academic Probation if:

  1. they fail to clear Academic Warning status receiving a second semester grade point average below 2.0, receive two F grades, or
  2. their cumulative grade point average falls below 2.0.

During the probation period, students should not take more than 12-14 units, Students may also be asked to curtail cocurricular and leadership activities. Such limitations may necessitate attendance at one or more summer sessions, or require an extra term for graduation. A student who remains on probation for two consecutive semesters will be subject to Academic Disqualification.

First Term Academic Probation is due to a cumulative GPA less than or equal to 2.0 and/or failure to clear prior Academic Warning Status. Second Term Program is most often the result of failure to clear First Term Academic Probation. As of Fall 2013, The Curriculum and Standards Committee voted that any student on Second Term Probation must take CALP 95, Academic Success Strategies.

Undergraduate Academic Disqualification

Undergraduate students will be subject to Academic Disqualification from further registration at Holy Names University if they meet any one of the following criteria:

  1. fail to clear probation for two consecutive semesters;
  2. earn a semester grade point average below 1.0;
  3. fail three or more courses in any semester.

Undergraduate Academic Reinstatement

Disqualified individuals may consider petitioning for reinstatement as a student of Holy Names University. To do this, individuals must write a letter directed to the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs indicating the intention to petition for reinstatement. The letter must also explain the academic and/or life circumstances that contributed to academic disqualification. Students may be asked to provide additional supporting documentation, such as a letter from a doctor indicating medical hardship. Petitions are strengthened by inclusion of a discussion of changes that have occurred since academic disqualification that would support future academic success at Holy Names University. One such indication is often the Dean’s request that the student take courses elsewhere that show progress toward the degree. The student should attempt to achieve an overall GPA of 2.0 when units and points from the transfer work are combined with the HNU units and points. Official transcripts of coursework completed in the interim at other institutions should be included with petitions for reinstatement. In evaluating a petition, Academic Affairs considers self-awareness, an understanding of the role of outside contributing factors, and commitment to future academic success to be important. Individuals are notified in writing of the outcome of their petition for reinstatement. When reinstatement is granted, students enter under reinstatement probation status in order to assist Academic Affairs in tracking their academic progress. Academic reinstatement is determined independently from reinstatement under Financial Aid or Student Accounts. Returning students work closely with the Academic Affairs Office, their advisor, and other staff and faculty to develop a reinstatement contract that maximizes their chance of successfully completing their academic goals. Reinstatement probation is cleared when the terms of the reinstatement contract are met.

Academic Responsibilities and Rights of Students

Students are individually responsible for knowing and observing the regulations, policies and procedures listed in this Catalog and all modifications, revisions, or additions which may be published in the Hawk’s Edge online system, HNU website, Blackboard classrooms, or HNU student email messages.

Policy of Nondiscrimination

Holy Names University does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, sex, handicap, age, color, sexual orientation, or national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational or admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic and other University-administered programs.

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, each student has the legal right to examine and challenge the record maintained for that student.

This Catalog constitutes the University’s document of record. While every effort is made to ensure the correctness and timeliness of information contained in this Catalog, the University cannot guarantee that changes will not occur after publication. More timely information may be found on the university’s website, student handbooks, and in the publications of each academic area. It is the responsibility of the individual student to become familiar with the announcements and regulations of the University that are printed in this Catalog and in other campus publications.

Academic Appeals

In academic questions, as in all other areas of appeal, the intent of the University is to try first to reach a resolution informally among those involved; failing this, more formal steps may be taken.

Academic appeals fall broadly into four categories:

  1. Those concerning a grade or a requirement in a particular course.
  2. Those concerning penalties resulting from violations of academic honesty.
  3. Those concerning the interpretation or application of a general education or major/degree/program requirement.
  4. Those concerning academic disqualification from the University.

    The procedures and timelines for dealing with these various categories of academic appeals are described below. Once an appeals process begins, all University personnel will protect the privacy of the student and the confidentiality of the process.

Academic Appeals Concerning a Grade or Requirement in a Particular Course:

Step 1 . The student will first contact the instructor who has assigned the grade in question or is responsible for determining course requirements. This step must be taken no later than the end of the academic term following the term in which the problem arose (excluding Summer term). Normally, students will resolve their concerns informally at this point.

Step 2 . If the question remains unresolved, the student may initiate a formal appeal process with the Chairperson. In order to initiate this process, the student will direct a written appeal to the Chairperson. The Chairperson will investigate the matter, meeting—at his/her discretion—with those involved. Within fifteen (15) working days of the receipt of the written appeal, the Chairperson will report in writing to the student his/her findings and decision.

Step 3 . The student may, within fifteen (15) working days following receipt of the Chairperson’s decision, direct a written appeal, including supporting evidence, to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Vice President will investigate the matter, meeting—at his/her discretion—with those involved. Within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of the student’s appeal, the Vice President will report in writing to the student his/her findings and decision. The decision of the Vice President is final even if a decision against the student will mean that the grade or requirement under appeal will result in academic disqualification. There is no further University appeal.

Academic Appeals Concerning Penalties Resulting from Violations of Academic ­Honesty:

Step 1 . Within fifteen (15) working days of receiving notification of the penalty by the instructor, the student may initiate a formal appeal process with the Chairperson. In order to initiate this process, the student will direct a written appeal to the Chairperson. The Chairperson will investigate the matter, meeting—at his/her discretion—with those involved. Within fifteen (15) working days of the receipt of the written appeal, the Chairperson will report in writing to the student his/her findings and decision. A copy of this report will be sent to the Academic Affairs Office and placed in the student’s file.

Step 2 . The student may, within fifteen (15) working days following receipt of the Chairperson’s decision, direct a written appeal, including supporting evidence, to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Vice President will investigate the matter, meeting—at his/her discretion—with those involved. Within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of the student’s appeal, the Vice President will report in writing to the student his/her findings and decision. A copy of this report will be placed in the student’s file. The decision of the Vice President is final even if a decision against the student will mean that the penalty will result in academic disqualification or dismissal. There is no further University appeal.

Academic Appeals Concerning the Interpretation or Application of a General Education or Major/Degree/Program Requirement:

Step 1 . The student will go first to the Chairperson. Normally, students will resolve their concerns informally at this point.

Step 2 . If the issue remains unresolved, the student may direct a written appeal, including supporting evidence, to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Vice President will investigate the matter, meeting—at his/her discretion—with those involved. Within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of the student’s appeal, the Vice President will report in writing to the student his/her findings and decision. The decision of the Vice President is final even if a decision against the student will mean that the requirement under appeal will result in academic disqualification or dismissal. There is no further University appeal.

Academic Appeals Concerning Academic Disqualification from the University:

Step 1. Undergraduate students should direct appeals of academic disqualification to the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs. Appeals must be made in writing within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of the academic disqualification letter. The Assistant Vice President will investigate the matter. Within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of the student’s appeal, the Assistant Vice President will report in writing to the student his/her findings and decision.

Step 2. Undergraduate students may appeal the decision of the Assistant Vice President to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The student must direct a written appeal to the Vice President within fifteen (15) working days of the receipt of the Assistant Vice President’s decision. The Vice President will investigate the matter. Within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of the student’s appeal, the Vice President will report in writing to the student his/her findings and decision. The decision of the Vice President is final. There is no further University appeal.

For grievances of a non-academic nature please consult the Grievance Policy in the HNU Student Handbook.

Statement on Registering Complaints

As a University guided by equity and fairness, Holy Names University takes seriously complaints and concerns regarding the institution. While we commit ourselves to the principle of subsidiarity, which involves direct dialogue with those closest in action to an issue, we also recognize in some cases that a more formal process is necessary.

To register a complaint about Holy Names University, please present it directly to the University’s Ombudsman, Sr. Carol Sellman, Vice President for Mission Integration. She may be reached at: sellman@hnu.edu

These contacts will provide you with a written explanation of the campus process for addressing your particular complaint(s) and answer any questions you may have to assure you a fair process.

If you believe that your complaint warrants further attention after exhausting all the steps outlined in writing to you by the Vice President for Mission Integration or Vice President for Student Affairs, you may contact either or both of the following:

  1. The WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC) at http://www.wascsenior.org/comments if your complaint is about the institution’s compliance with academic program quality and accrediting standards. WSCUC is the academic accrediting body for Holy Names University.
  2. The Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education at 2535 Capitol Oaks Dr., Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833;www.bppe.ca.gov; (916) 431-6924 (phone); (916) 263-1897 (fax).

Most complaints made to media outlets or public figures, including members of the California legislature, Congress, the Governor, or individual Trustees of Holy Names University are referred to the University President’s Office.

Nothing in this disclosure limits any right that you may have to seek civil or criminal legal action to resolve your complaints.

Holy Names University has provided this disclosure to you in compliance with the requirements of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, as regulated in CFR 34, Sections 600.9 (b) (3) and 668.43(b).

University Ombudsperson

Holy Names University’s ombudsperson is a designated neutral or impartial dispute resolution practitioner whose major function is to provide confidential and informal assistance to students of the University community. Sister Carol Sellman, Vice President for Mission Integration, serves in this capacity currently.