2018-2019 Catalog

ISAC - Integrative Studies Across Cultures Courses

ISAC 1 The Ancient World

The first course in the Integrative Studies Across Cultures program starts at the beginning of time with a rapid trip through a cosmic calendar using the findings of archeology, paleontology, physics, biology, and art to discover the marks of human ancestors. Students encounter the ancient peoples and cultures of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas through primary sources that include myth, drama, law code, satire, poetry, religion, music and art, philosophy, and science. We meet nomadic hunters, settled villagers, artisans, warriors, scientists, priests, poets, and politicians as human links in the network of issues that make us what we are today.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENGL 1A or ESLG 24B is required for all students taking the course for lower-division credit; completion of ENGL 1B is required of all students taking the course for upper-division credit.

ISAC 2 The Premodern World

The second course explores the period from the sixth to the early seventeenth centuries of the common era when students see how art, love, and war are played out in the development and integration of new centers of commerce, religion, and statecraft in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe. The spread of written language furthered the recording of oral traditions thus laying the foundations for many modern studies. It is a dynamic time when religious scholars, traders, and armies fostered powerful intellectual, scientific, and technological achievements. These achievements are illustrated through primary source readings and visual and performing arts.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENGL 1A or ESLG 24B is required for all students taking the course for lower-division credit; completion of ENGL 1B is required of all students taking the course for upper-division credit.

ISAC 101 The Ancient World

The first course in the Integrative Studies Across Cultures program starts at the beginning of time with a rapid trip through a cosmic calendar using the findings of archeology, paleontology, physics, biology, and art to discover the marks of human ancestors. Students encounter the ancient peoples and cultures of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas through primary sources that include myth, drama, law code, satire, poetry, religion, music and art, philosophy, and science. We meet nomadic hunters, settled villagers, artisans, warriors, scientists, priests, poets, and politicians as human links in the network of issues that make us what we are today.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENGL 1A or ESLG 24B is required for all students taking the course for lower-division credit; completion of ENGL 1B is required of all students taking the course for upper-division credit.

ISAC 102 The Premodern World

The second course explores the period from the sixth to the early seventeenth centuries of the common era when students see how art, love, and war are played out in the development and integration of new centers of commerce, religion, and statecraft in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe. The spread of written language furthered the recording of oral traditions thus laying the foundations for many modern studies. It is a dynamic time when religious scholars, traders, and armies fostered powerful intellectual, scientific, and technological achievements. These achievements are illustrated through primary source readings and visual and performing arts.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENGL 1A or ESLG 24B is required for all students taking the course for lower-division credit; completion of ENGL 1B is required of all students taking the course for upper-division credit.

ISAC 103 The Modern World

This course covers the period from the early seventeenth to the late nineteenth centuries, examining the new ideas, discoveries, and processes leading to the eventual interconnection of all areas of the world in a global system. Some of the factors contributing to globalization include discoveries in the physical sciences, the creation of a world system of commercial exchange, revolutionary political theories and revolution, industrial production, and imperialism.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENGL 1A or ESLG 24B is required for all students taking the course for lower-division credit; completion of ENGL 1B is required of all students taking the course for upper-division credit.

ISAC 104 The Contemporary World

The last of the chronological courses in the Integrative Studies Across Cultures program examines the twentieth century in which issues of continuity and change, order and fragmentation, and the problem of meaning are explored. Through multicultural readings, students experience the diversity of the human adventure. Insights from literature, psychology, genetics, music, history, sociology, physics, art, and political science help us in the difficult task of understanding the world in which we are living.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

Concurrent enrollment in or completion of ENGL 1A or ESLG 24B is required for all students taking the course for lower-division credit; completion of ENGL 1B is required of all students taking the course for upper-division credit.

ISAC 195(W) Senior Colloquium

The Senior Colloquium is the capstone course specifically designed to provide the culminating academic experience integrating the General Education aspect of the Baccalaureate program with the student's major field of study. In the Colloquium, senior students address together a topic of common human concern through which they explore and share perspectives on the broader historical, cultural and ethical dimensions and intellectual context of what they have learned in their undergraduate program.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

ENGL 1B