2018-2019 Catalog

PSYC - Psychology Courses

PSYC 1 Introduction to Psychology

An introductory survey of the major areas within psychology including psychological development, human cognition, psychophysiology, personality theory, psychopathology, and social interaction.

Credits
3

PSYC 20 Introductory Psychology Seminar

A review of the psychological literature within a single area of psychology with practical applications in community settings. As part of this introductory seminar, students will gain experience on how to review and critically assess prior research in psychology. Students will also be expected to do volunteer work weekly with a school, counseling center, or nonprofit organization where they can apply what they have learned in the seminar to nonacademic situations.

Credits
4

Prerequisites

PSYC 1, Psychology major, Freshman standing, and Instructor Permission.

PSYC 30 Introduction to Life-Span Development

An examination of the major theories of and influences on human development from conception through death, including the biological, cognitive, emotional, social, and culture dimensions of development.

Credits
3

PSYC 63 Statistical Methods

An introduction to the statistical analysis of behavioral data, including the use and interpretation of frequency tables and graphical representations, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, sampling theory, correlation, parametric and nonparametric tests.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

Placement into GE level mathematics or successful completion of MATH A at HNU.

PSYC 100(W) Experimental Psychology

An introduction to the methods of experimentation used within psychology. Emphasis is placed on the different types of experimental designs, the control of experimental variables, the analysis of quantitative data, and the critical evaluation of experimental research. As part of the course, students design, carry out, and report on a laboratory experiment of their own.

Credits
4

Prerequisites

PSYC 1 and PSYC 63 or equivalent courses with a grades of C- or better; ENGL 1B.

PSYC 108(W) Field Methods

An introduction to the theoretical perspectives, research designs, and key methods related to field research. Particular emphasis is placed on survey research, participant observation, and qualitative interviewing. As part of the course, students design, carry out, and report on a field or survey project of their own.

Credits
4

Prerequisites

ENGL 1B; PSYC 63 or equivalent with a grade of C- or better and either PSYC 1 or SOCI 1 with a grade of C- or better.

Cross Listed Courses

SOCI 108(W)

PSYC 120 Learning and Cognition

An introduction to the issues, theories, principles, and practical applications of cognitive psychology. Topics include learning, attention, perception, mental imagery, memory, knowledge, representation, language processing, problem-solving, decision-making, and creativity.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

PSYC 1 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 124 Physiological Psychology

A study of the biological bases of behavior in animals and humans. Emphasis is on the physiological process of neuron activity, sensory systems of vision and audition, learning and memory, diurnal functions, and selective disorders of the brain.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

PSYC 1 and BIOL 15 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 125 Psychology of Emotion

A comprehensive overview of the study of human emotions. As part of this course, students learn about the basic theories of emotion (from classical philosophy to modern approaches in neuroscience), the physiological substrates of emotion, the methods of emotion research, and the core findings of emotion research as they apply to clinical, applied, and research psychology.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

PSYC 1 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 128 Human Sexuality

A survey course addressing human sexuality from a variety of perspectives-psychological, physiological, legal, religious, and cultural. Topics include sexual anatomy and physiology, reproduction, contraception, abortion, sexually-transmitted diseases, PMS, AIDS, and rape.

Credits
3

PSYC 130 Child and Adolescent Development

A survey of fundamental principles, theories, and research in both child and adolescent development, including an examination of cognitive, emotional, physical, and social aspects of the development of children and adolescents. Consideration is given to the social context of childhood and adolescence and to the adolescent's transition to adulthood.

Credits
3

PSYC 131 Adult Development and Aging

An examination of young adulthood, middle age, and aging. Physical, intellectual, social, personality, and career development will be covered, as well as issues such as pregnancy and childbirth, parenting, mid-life transitions, death, and bereavement.

Credits
3

PSYC 132 Cognitive Development

A survey of the changes in cognitive abilities from birth to adolescence focusing on six areas of intellectual development: perception, conceptual representation, memory, language acquisition, problem solving, and reasoning. The course emphasizes both normal and abnormal development, and serves as a preparation for teaching and/or graduate study in child, developmental, or educational psychology.

Credits
3

PSYC 134 Personality and Social Development

A comprehensive analysis of the cognitive changes and life experiences that contribute to the development of personality characteristics and the quality of interpersonal relationships. Special attention is given to the development of emotional ties, impulse control, independence, competence, caring, morality, self-worth, and personal identity.

Credits
3

PSYC 140 Social Psychology

An investigation of how the behavior or feelings of one individual are influenced by the behavior and/or characteristics of others. Topics include: perception of self and others, attribution processes, attitudes, attraction, social influence, conformity, power, aggression, and groups.

Credits
3

Cross Listed Courses

SOCI 140

PSYC 143 Group Processes and Communication

A course designed to give an understanding of interpersonal, group, and intergroup behavior using experiential learning methods. Topics covered: verbal and nonverbal communication, problem solving, conflict management, leadership, competition and cooperation, norms, and intergroup influence. Limited enrollment.

Credits
3

PSYC 147 Gender Issues

An examination of the various psychological, social, and political issues related to gender from multiple theoretical perspective. Topics include, but are not limited to the differences between men and women, the development of masculine and feminine sex roles, and the social construction of gender appropriate behavior.

Credits
3

Cross Listed Courses

SOCI 147

PSYC 148(W) Organizational Behavior

A study of human behavior within organizations. This course studies examines the impact of organizations on individuals and groups and explores how managers can support and develop people for the benefit of both individuals and institutions. Topics include career development, perception, motivation, group dynamics, leadership, power and influence, conflict and ethical issues within organizations.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

ENGL 1B

Cross Listed Courses

BSAD 148(W)

PSYC 160 Psychology of Personality

Application of the scientific method to an understanding of normal personality-its description, development, and evaluation. Methods of personality assessment, including interview techniques, case studies, and psychological testing are also introduced.

Credits
3

PSYC 167 Counseling Theories and Procedures

An overview of current approaches, techniques, and issues in counseling, including a consideration of these approaches: person-centered, psychodynamic, cognitive and behavior therapy, reality therapy, gestalt, and transactional analysis.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

PSYC 160 recommended.

PSYC 168 Psychopathology

The study of psychological disturbances: anxiety and depressive reactions, psychoses, and character disorders and the role of psychodynamic, cognitive, social, and biological factors etiology.

Credits
3

Prerequisites

PSYC 160 recommended.

PSYC 169 Community Psychology

Community psychology looks at the relationships between individual well-being and social systems in community contexts. This course focuses largely on the issues of homelessness, poverty, mental illness, and drug addiction, and how social and political structures both promote these conditions as well as assist individuals and communities that live with these conditions. As part of the class, students are expected to serve at a community-based agency, such as a women's shelter or a homeless adults' drop-in center, and to integrate their community experiences with psychological theories, research, and practices.

Credits
4

Prerequisites

PSYC 1 or consent of instructor; PSYC 168 recommended.

Cross Listed Courses

SOCI 168

PSYC 174 Sport Psychology

An examination of how personality, self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and other psychological characteristics relate to participation and performance in sports and physical activities. Students will develop an appreciation for the relevance of cognitive styles, attention and concentration in sport and exercise, and practical strategies for assisting people with issues related to these topics.

Credits
3

PSYC 195(W) Senior Coordinating Seminar

A review of the history of psychology, intended as an integrating theme for seniors completing the Psychology major. As part of the seminar, students research a topic of personal interest to present in both written and seminar format; a presentation of students' research is made to the University community at the end of the course. Preparations for career applications in psychology are also addressed. Beyond a lengthy study of the history of psychology, this course also entails personal work in positive psychology, oral presentations, professional visitors, and out-of-class activities related to career and professional development.

Credits
4

Prerequisites

Psychology major and Senior standing; ENGL 1B.

PSYC 196 Internship in Psychology

Supervised on- or off-campus work experience in a research laboratory, business office, community service agency, or school setting, designed to provide professional training related to psychology. Students arrange for an internship related to their professional interests and goals and, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, develop an internship plan that outlines specific work responsibilities and learning outcomes.

Credits
1-3, Credit/No Credit

Prerequisites

Advisor approval.

PSYC 198 Research

Credits
1-3